Biofuels Digest, BIO Launch Spring 2011 Bioenergy Business Outlook Survey

Biofuels Digest and the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) invite the industry to take part in the Spring 2011 Bioenergy Business Outlook Survey.

The survey examines growth expectations and opportunities from a company, national and organizational point of view. It also examines the role of research, government policy, finance, and research and market partners in creating opportunities or barriers to the growth of green jobs, energy security and reductions in greenhouse gas emissions.

The survey is open to organizations in all sectors of the industry – including producers, research and teaching organizations, associations, equipment suppliers, offtake partners and suppliers of services to the industry.

Respondents to the 21 question survey will receive a detailed summary of the survey’s findings and commentary on trends from the Biofuels Digest editorial team. Summarized results will be published in Biofuels Digest, but the customized, in-depth summary will be available only to respondents.

The Winter 2010 Bioenergy Business Outlook Survey conducted in December drew responses from companies representing an estimated 4,200 green jobs and more than $3 billion in annual sales. That survey showed that 80 percent of bioenergy executives were more optimistic both about their organization’s prospects for growth and industry growth, than 12 months prior. It also showed that confidence about industry growth prospects had jumped 11 percentage points in the final quarter of 2010.

Follow this link to go straight to the 2011 Spring Bioenergy Business Outlook Survey.

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2010 in review

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads This blog is on fire!.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

The average container ship can carry about 4,500 containers. This blog was viewed about 20,000 times in 2010. If each view were a shipping container, your blog would have filled about 4 fully loaded ships.

In 2010, there were 27 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 158 posts. There were 10 pictures uploaded. That’s about a picture per month.

The busiest day of the year was June 29th with 186 views. The most popular post that day was Algae-Based Biofuels.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were bio.org, BIOtech-NOW.org, alternative-energy-news.info, corncommentary.com, and convention.bio.org.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for biofuels, biofuel energy, biofuels and climate change, industrial biotechnology, and advanced biofuels.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

Algae-Based Biofuels June 2010
4 comments

2

GHG Lifecycle February 2008
3 comments

3

Biofuels Defined February 2008
11 comments

4

Biotech & Biofuels February 2008

5

Industrial Biotechnology: Biobased Products, Biofuels, and Synthetic Biology March 2010

Video of Plenary Sessions from BIO’s World Congress

BIO’s World Congress on Industrial Biotechnology held 6 plenary sessions, featuring Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack and DOE Asst. Secretary Cathy Zoi. Additionally, a World Economic Forum report on the Future of Industrial Biorefineries, detailing the potential economic contribution that industrial biotechnology can make, was presented by Novozymes CEO Steen Riisgaard. And a survey of the industrial biotech and advanced biofuel industry by McKinsey & Co. took the pulse of executives in the industry.

In the June 28 plenary session, DOE Asst. Sec. Zoi announces funding totaling $24 million for three algae biofuel research consortia.

During the June 29 plenary session, Ag. Sec. Vilsack indicated that the Obama administration supports biofuel development as a means of boosting rural employment and economic development.

Novozymes CEO Riisgaard followed Vilsack, saying that “converting biomass into fuels, energy, and chemicals has the potential to generate upwards of $230 billion to the global economy by 2020.”

Earlier that day, McKinsey & Co.’s Raoul Oberman presented the findings of a survey of the industry, including that more than half of respondents said there is currently insufficient capital to support growth of the industry.

Woolsey, Khosla get it

At the World Congress on Industrial Biotechnology and Bioprocessing plenary breakfast this morning, “Investing in Energy Security and Industrial Biotechnology – A Venture Capitalist’s Perspective” Jim Woolsey, Venture Partner at Vantage Point and Vinod Khosla, Founder of Khosla Ventures highlighted impressive prospects for industrial biotechnologies such as biofuels, products and renewable specialty chemicals. Mr. Woolsey said it best, renewable electricity technologies such as nuclear and wind, do nothing to reduce our dependence on oil. And it sounds like it wouldn’t even “green” our electricity production. If we electrified the majority of our passenger auto fleet, those plug-ins, hybrids or battery-powered autos could likely run on the electricity capacity we already have. Meaning, no wind or solar facilities would be built. Instead, existing, likely coal-fired power plants, would simply increase their output to meet the demand. Mr. Khosla focused on the economic viability of the different biofuels technologies and renewable specialty chemicals. He presented a view of the broad spectrum by breaking the opportunities down to feedstock options, processing technologies, and end products and categorized the economic viability for each combination. 

Importantly this morning’s speakers highlighted the availability for industrial biotechnologies to assist in significantly reducing petroleum use in the near term and the opportunity for innovation, particularly in the small, entrepreneurial realm of industrial biotechnology. The future looks bright for these companies with a broad spectrum of opportunities on the horizon.

Ways and Means Should Include Job Creation of Advanced Biofuels and Bioproducts in Green Jobs Leg

On Wednesday, April 14 the House Ways and Means Committee will hold a hearing on Energy Tax Incentives Driving the Green Job Economy. The focus of the hearing is to examine the effectiveness of current energy tax policy and identify additional steps that the Committee can take to ensure continued job growth in this area while at the same time advancing national energy policy focus on a discussion of current and proposed energy tax incentives. Witnesses for this hearing have not been announced and we do not know how much of the hearing will focus on transportation fuels however, energy tax incentives for biofuels and biobased products should be a significant area of focus for this round of green jobs legislation. These technologies are ready to deploy and create near term job opportunities.

Industrial biotechnology is the key enabling technology for producing biofuels and biobased products like bioplastics and renewable chemicals to aid in reducing our dependence on foreign sources of oil, thereby reducing greenhouse gas emissions. They also have the ability to crate jobs, jobs that are currently moving overseas due to their reliance on petroleum as a feedstock or more favorable economic or political environments.

The United States has invested considerable amounts of taxpayer dollars to try to revive our economy. Too often, though, the resulting jobs are being created overseas, as other countries invest in green technology deployment. As a result, the opportunity to improve our economic competitiveness is lost. The United States is a leader in the research and development of green technologies, but to maintain that lead we must invest in the companies that are putting that green technology to work in our economy. These industries have shed hundreds of thousands of domestic jobs over the past two decades, as petroleum producing countries have attracted more capital investment. For example, U.S. chemical and plastics companies have increased capital investment outside the United States by 32 percent over the past decade, while increasing investment within U.S. borders by only 2 percent.

The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) enacted as part of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 sets the minimum level of renewable fuel that must be produced and blended into the US transportation fuel supply at 36 billion gallons by 2022. 21 billion gallons of that requirement must be cellulosic or advanced biofuels. Direct job creation from the advanced and cellulosic biofuels volumes in the RFS could reach 29,000 by 2010, rising to 190,000 by 2022. Total job creation could reach 123,000 in 2010 and 807,000 by 2022. Jobs will be across many sectors of the economy. Some projected job creation sectors are: labor/freight, mixing and blending machine operators, shopping/receiving/traffic clerks, truck drivers, chemical equipment/technicians, chemical plant/system operators/electrical, sales etc.

The Ways and Means Committee can aid in accelerating this job creation by incentivizing biorefinery construction here in the United States. In 2008 Congress enacted a cellulosic biofuels production tax credit and enhanced depreciation for advanced biofuels facilities as part of the 2008 Farm Bill, both of which are scheduled to expire on December 31, 2012. Due to an overall downturn in the worldwide economy, this tax credit has not yet been utilized by cellulosic biofuels producers. This credit needs to be extended now in order to signal to investors that a plant being constructed this year, will have certainty in the availability of that tax credit once the plant begins to produce the advanced biofuel. A tax credit that expires before or shortly after production begins, does not create economic security for a yet to be built advanced biofuel biorefinery looking for funding. Furthermore, capital costs for construction of next generation biorefineries, which utilize renewable biomass to produce next generation biofuels and biobased products, are a substantial barrier to commercialization. Congress should provide an investment tax credit to help accelerate construction of next generation biorefineries and speed deployment of next generation fuels, chemicals and products.

Historically, the U.S. chemicals and plastics industry was the envy of the world. At its peak in the 1950s, the industry was responsible for over 5 million domestic jobs and a $20 billion positive trade balance for the United States. Jobs associated with the industry were typically among the highest paid in U.S. manufacturing. However, the petro-chemicals and plastics industries are now hemorrhaging jobs overseas. Conversely, biobased products and chemicals production, like domestically produced biofuels, will stay in the U.S., in close proximity to their biomass feedstocks. Total US employment in the chemicals industry declined by over 20% in the last two decades and is projected to decrease further. The US is a world leader in industrial biotechnology with a wide range of companies pioneering new, renewable pathways to traditional petroleum-based chemicals and plastics.

The potential job creation from bio-products is immense. Consider that the nascent biobased products industry employed over 5,700 Americans at 159 facilities in 2007 and every new job in the chemical industry creates 5.5 additional jobs elsewhere in the economy. Currently the biobased products portion represents only about 4 percent of all sales for the industry. Congress should create targeted production tax credits that can help them to expand their share of the market and grow additional domestic jobs. With an industry with the potential to grow by over 50% per year, bio-products can form the basis for a strong employment growth engine for the US.

Clearly commercializing the advanced biofuels and biobased products industries is an integral solution to creating high caliber domestic green jobs in the United States that will catapult this country to be a leader in successful high tech, sustainable technologies. BIO will be urging the Ways and Means Committee through written comments to recognize that innovations such as these are some of the most promising sources of green jobs and economic growth for the future.

Road Music: From Bluegrass to Switchgrass

To get from here to there sometimes you need a little road music, and that’s just what the Biofuels Center of North Carolina is aiming to do. Earlier this week, according to Science in the Triangle,

a RTI Fellows Symposium,

“was held Monday and Tuesday at the University of North Carolina’s Friday Center in Chapel Hill.

Global warming and what role biofuels will play in the energy supply were two of the scientific challenges addressed at the symposium.”

According to Science in the Triangle, North Carolina focuses,

“on biodiesel and ethanol from corn and biomass to meet an ambitious goal: By 2017, 10 percent of liquid fuels sold in the state should be locally grown and produced.

The first corn ethanol plant is scheduled to go online in January in Hoke County, said Burke (Steven Burke, chief executive of the Biofuels Center of North Carolina) of the biofuels center.

Fourteen biomass feedstocks have been planted at research sites and private farms statewide and North Carolina’s 18 million acres of forest are expected to contribute wood waste for ethanol production.

The state also has a partnership with RTI to produce ethanol in other ways than fermentation. Outside of that partnership, RTI recently was awarded a federally funded contract to work on a process that turns biomass into a type of bio oil, which can be mixed and refined with petroleum.

The state’s 10 percent goal is a tall order, Burke acknowledged. It will require an increase of biofuels production from 2 million gallons in 2008 to 600 million gallons in 2017.

He’s counting on music to gain support and boost demand for biofuels. The biofuels center signed up 19 artists, who agreed to have their fan Web sites linked to the center’s site. All artists are featured on a CD called “From Bluegrass to Switchgrass.”

Burke called it music “for a state obsessed with fast-driving NASCAR.”

To listen to “From Bluegrass to Switchgrass,” for yourself visit the Biofuels Center of North Carolina.

Webinars for Reporters: Pacific Rim Summit to Host Forums on Algae, Cellulosic Biofuels and Renewable Chemicals

BIO will host three webinars from the Pacific Rim Summit on Industrial Biotechnology and Bioenergy in Honolulu, featuring companies, researchers, and policy makers at the forefront of efforts to commercialize algae applications, cellulosic biofuels, and renewable chemicals.

1.International Developments in Algae Commercialization
Valerie Reed, U.S. Department of Energy;
Patrick McGinn, Institute of Marine Biosciences, National Research Council, Canada;
Ravi Shrivastava, Defence Research Development Organization, India.
Monday Nov. 9, 3:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. EST
(12:00 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. PST
10:00 a.m to 11:30 a.m HST)

2.Meeting the Challenges of Commercializing Cellulosic Ethanol
William Baum, Verenium Corporation, http://www.verenium.com;
Kevin Gray, Qteros, http://www.qteros.com;
James Imbler, ZeaChem, Inc., http://www.zeachem.com.
Tuesday Nov. 10, 2:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. EST
(11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. PST
9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. HST)

3.Commercialization of Renewable Chemicals
Christophe Schilling, Genomatica, http://www.genomatica.com;
Steven J. Gatto, Myriant Technologies, LLC, http://www.myriant.com;
Bhima Vijayendran, Battelle Memorial Institute, http://www.battelle.org.
Wednesday Nov. 11, 2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. EST
(11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. PST
9:00 a.m to 10:30 a.m HST)

RSVP: A password will be required to participate in each webinar. The webinars will be available at https://biotechnology.webex.com/biotechnology. To reserve space and receive password instructions, please contact Paul Winters, Communications Director, BIO at 202-962-9237 or pwinters@bio.org.
These sessions are presented live from the 2009 Pacific Rim Summit on Industrial Biotechnology and Bioenergy, being held Nov. 8-11, 2009 in Honolulu. The Pacific Rim Summit is the only global conference dedicated to building innovative collaborations in industrial biotechnology across the Pacific. http://www.bio.org/pacrim/.